Thursday, May 9, 2013

The Voynich Manuscript: Ivy-Leaved Bellflower

The Ivy-leaved Bellflower (Wahlenbergia hederacea) is my choice for the plant on fol.32v of the Voynich Manuscript at this time.


4 comments:

  1. If you would like to verify your ID, I can give you my assignment of alphabet characters or syllables to each of the Voynich characters. You would then be able to search for "key" words to confirm your ID. Only if the terminology has changed considerably over centuries, would the Vms remain "unsolved".

    oa-ll-a-n-P-e-c-e-c-g

    ReplyDelete
  2. If you would like to verify your ID, I can give you my assignment of alphabet characters or syllables to each of the Voynich characters. You would then be able to search for "key" words to confirm your ID. Only if the terminology has changed considerably over centuries, would the Vms remain "unsolved".

    oa-ll-a-n-P-e-c-e-c-g

    ReplyDelete
  3. I apologize for the double posts. My computer is very old, and has been upgraded twice (added a sound card). Ennyway, I'm trying to explain that the "W" appears in the ms as "oa" The vms combination for qua" is what appears to be the numeral 4. Depending on the word and context, you would see: 4 or q , usually prefixed with vowel, and a string of cce-cae-cec......quite often concluding with 8 g. That ending is nomenclatural aes-ceus.

    That very elaborate P which begins every botanical discussion represents the "Especies discussion...

    Its been a long day, but fun checking the botanical offerings of our local garden-orium. They have the most beautiful lily-pond (bright pink flowers) and koi fish. No lotus -- I got a faint, not quite dead-pan look from the proprietor. Cross my heart, I wasn't looking for the Sacred Bean (supposed to be mildly hallucinogenic).

    Bye!

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  4. Hi BD, the terminology is a real mess and my impression is that it has changed dramatically. For example, Wahlenbergia comes from the name of a 19th century Swedish naturalist. The names in the old herbals are often messed up too - it is like broken phone game from manuscript to manuscript.
    Some names, however, survived longer - the calendula, for example.
    It will be interesting if one day some of those old-name flowers can help code-breaker to convince the world their discovery is the one and only.

    All the best! Ellie

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